Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House

6.3 IMDb
8 September 2017 Release
Duration
Genres:Biography, Drama, History
Year:2017
Country:USA
Director:
Writers:,
11 Votes
64%

Watch Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House 2017 full movie online for free

The story of Mark Felt, who under the name "Deep Throat" helped journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the Watergate scandal in 1972.

Enjoy Watching Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House Online!

Movie Comments

  1. subxerogravity, 2 weeks ago
    God! I wish this was Taken 4!:

    I know I know, this is not met to be anywhere near the action packed "man with many skills" thrillers that the great Liam Neeson has become so well known for. This was met to be a dramatic turn that actors of his caliber take for the fulfilling challenge of the craft. You know what the real challenge is? Sitting through this slow burn.

    I could not believe this movie was only an hour and forty three minutes, it felt like I was sitting in that seat for a lifetime watching the dullest investigation I have ever seen. The crappy part is that the movie is so focus on the performance of Neeson as Mark Felt that they don't even bother really going through the investigation of Watergate. You would think that would be good considering the movie is called Mark Felt, but in reality , the movie tells you nothing about the man. I feel like I have very little insight into him, even when they did detours into his life with his wife , played by the beautiful Diane Lane, and his estrange relationship with his daughter of which he uses FBI resources to resolve.

    It's one of the most famous scandals in history. Not that I was that much interested in it from a entertainment standpoint, but I'm really surprise this movie did nothing to at least spark a little interest. It was so dull, sooooo dull and they met for it to be that dull. You can tell from the dark gloomy colors and the fact that they did not use music to give the effect of suspense, and unfortunately, no one's acting (not even Neeson) was good enough to support this illusion of lack of effort the movie is trying to give.

    Skip this one man, read a book if you want to learn about Mark Felt. Hopefully the set in the 80s sequel were the Soviets take Felt's daughter and he uses his FBI skills to get her back will be a lot better.

    http://cinemagardens.com
  2. Danny Blankenship, 2 weeks ago
    Every history buff knows "Watergate" and the scandal that shook Washington and took down president "Nixon" and the term "Deep Throat" rings a bell with this issue. Well finally a film puts this person in showcase spotlight that being Mark Felt(good performance from Liam Neeson) the man who brought down the white house literally. The film is informative with the behind the scenes look at the interviews and investigations after the "Watergate" break ins and it's looked at first with doubt, cover up, skepticism, and not wanting to believe from not just the administration, but many agents who are close to Nixon want a cover up. However Mark Felt is the one agent who wants answers and the truth as he feels the need for honor and integrity. So this film is a well done investigative journey of the behind the scenes workings of the political game and it's under the table moves and ways of doing business, while it seeks truth and justice while bringing down those involved. Really if your a history buff this is a near perfect film to watch as it's informative.
  3. lor_, 2 weeks ago
    A brief clip of Walter Cronkite on TV in "Mark Felt..." reminded me of the authority the legendary newscaster generated back in the day, and star Liam Neeson likewise lends immeasurable gravitas to this film of ideas, a tangential look at the Watergate case.

    Just as Mark Felt, self-identified decades later to be the mysterious Deep Throat who aided Woodward & Bernstein in revealing to the public the White House wrongdoings, is a footnote in American history, so too this well-made movie is destined to be a mere footnote in film history. That's because it does not fit into popular genres, specifically the thriller, but is more the province of television drama in the 21st Century.

    Back in the day, this would have been an A-production release from United Artists or later Columbia Pictures in the Stanley Kramer vein, his films about ideas and problem subjects like "The Men" with Brando or "Home of the Brave", but nowadays it is up to successor company to Columbia, specialty division, namely Sony Pictures Classics, to bring this worthy effort to a blasé public.

    I happen to love movies of this type, far more than the Action Man pictures like "Taken" that have made of middle-aged actor Neeson an iconic action figure. The best movie I recall is "Command Decision", a war movie, but minus the action, and more recently (though 2 decades back) the excellent "Executive Decision" starring Kurt Russell.

    Felt's importance at the FBI, notably in the wake of J. Edgar's death, is the principal thrust of Peter Landesman's film. It moves along on a low flame, tension mounting imperceptibly under the handicap of the viewer being already aware, certainly in broad strokes, of the incidents being covered in the wake of the burglary of Dem offices at D.C.'s Watergate Hotel, as well as the ultimate outcome. But using insider Felt's point- of-view gives us an interesting vantage point.

    Neeson as Felt is a noir hero, self-divided and trying to do the right thing but caught in a malevolent universe where, to paraphrase TV's "The Fugitive", fate is moving a huge hand. His conflict with new acting FBI head Gray, well-played subtly by Marton Csokas, is quite believable, and helps to add depth to the otherwise black & white "whose side are you on" in the story's depiction of a war between the evil White House and the "standing up for our country" FBI.

    It is Felt's personal life that creates the movie's emotional core, at first seeming irrelevant but actually paying off by movie's end more forcefully than the character's heroics. He's carrying a torch for his missing daughter Joan (Maika Monroe, in an understated turn), who brings in a serious subplot of the society's counterculture from the '60s and a different kind of terrorism than that confronting the nation and the FBI today. Felt's belated war against the Weather Underground and other leftist domestic groups is what proves to be his personal downfall, as he ends up resorting to horrible, illegal tactics just as his dreaded villain of a former co-worker Sullivan (smoothly played by instant bad guy Tom Sizemore) and innumerable Nixon cronies did. I found Felt's Jekyll & Hyde split personality traits of honor vs. expediency to be the core of the movie's subdued power.

    Casting of Monroe was a big help, as she closely resembles mom Diane Lane, the latter actress doing well in a very difficult role that suffers in Landesman's writing from a bit too many '50s/'60s clichés of the unfulfilled woman trapped in a marriage that rendered her totally subservient/dependent on her husband.

    NOTE: Previous review posted on IMDb is a trashing of the movie by someone who hadn't seen it -just assuming how bad and slanted it would be. I've wished this website would control such poor and distracting behavior by users -antithetical to the whole purpose of submitting reviews.
  4. cystanley, 2 weeks ago
    I don't know why viewers continue to cut down movies, writers and directors just because they take liberty with the facts. Hollywood does what it does to keep the action going and to make films interesting.

    How in the world do the previous reviewers know the facts? Most of them probably were children when Deep Throat occurred and have read and retained only stories about Felt that matched their own interpretations.

    Give Landesman a chance. Felt was the subject, Felt was one of the writers, Felt was the consultant. Only someone who was part of the actual situation is privileged to give his own interpretation.

    Face it, naysayers, interpretation is what life is all about, and we all need to just watch and see movies as another interpretation. Don't jump on the cast and director just because you don't like the interpretation.